Graduate Concentrations

Graduate Concentrations

The following concentration areas are available for students admitted to the MCE, MAS, MCE/MBA and Ph.D. degrees in Civil Engineering:

  • Civil Infrastructure Systems — asset management, natural disaster risk analysis, and infrastructure vulnerability.
  • Coastal Engineering — coastal engineering, wave mechanics, and environmental fluid mechanics.
  • Environmental Engineering — water and wastewater treatment, environmental chemistry and remediation, and solid and hazardous waste management.
  • Geotechnical Engineering — computational geomechanics, soil mechanics, foundation engineering, earth structures engineering, and ground improvement.
  • Structural Engineering — structural mechanics, analysis, and design; bridge engineering; structural dynamics; computational mechanics; and structural engineering materials.
  • Transportation Engineering — urban transportation, traffic engineering, systems engineering, logistics engineering, railroad engineering, and engineering management.
  • Water Resources Engineering — groundwater hydraulics, groundwater contamination, watershed management, hydrology, and water quality control.

Students must meet the requirements for their specific concentration, in addition to meeting the general degree requirements for all master’s degree students. Study in two or more related concentrations is allowed, but students must complete the core course requirements for both programs as part of their 30-credit requirement.

Civil Infrastructure Systems

asset management, natural disaster risk analysis, and infrastructure vulnerability

Overview

Civil infrastructure systems involves the design, analysis, and management of infrastructure supporting human activities, including, for example, electric power, oil and gas, water and wastewater, communications, transportation, and the collections of buildings that make up urban and rural communities. These networks deliver essential services, provide shelter, and support social interactions and economic development. They are society’s lifelines.

The field of civil infrastructure systems builds on and extends traditional civil engineering areas. Rather than focus on individual structural components or structures, civil infrastructure systems emphasizes how different structures behave together as a system that serves a community’s needs. Problems in this field typically involve a great deal of uncertainty, multiple and competing objectives, and sometimes numerous and conflicting constituencies. They are often spatial and dynamic. The technical aspects of infrastructure engineering must be understood in the social, economic, political, and cultural context in which they exist, and must be considered over a long-time horizon that includes not just design and construction, but maintenance, operations, performance in natural disasters and other extreme events, and destruction as well.

MCE/MAS Course Requirements

See the Master’s Degree Requirements in Civil Engineering for the general academic requirements. In addition, the Master’s degree in Civil Engineering or Applied Science in the field of Civil Infrastructure Systems requires three core courses and five electives taken from a variety of fields. Electives should be selected based on discussions with your advisor.

PhD Requirements

PhD degrees are also offered in the Civil Infrastructure Systems field. The courses listed above serve as a foundation for the PhD degree. PhD students work with their advisor to develop a program of study that provides appropriate breadth and depth. See the PhD in Civil Engineering for the general academic requirements.

Courses

Core Courses:

  • CIEG 655 – Civil Infrastructure Systems
  • CIEG 641 – Risk Analysis
  • CIEG 659 – Optimization in Design and Construction OR
  • APEC 601 – Survey of Operations Research I

Suggested electives include:

  • Civil Infrastructure Systems
    • CIEG 650 – Urban Transportation Systems
    • CIEG 611 – Structural Dynamics Design
    • CIEG 667 – Resilience Engineering
    • CIEG 667 – Sensors
    • CIEG 811 – Advanced Structural Dynamics Design
  • Modeling
    • MAST 663 – Decision Tools for Policy Analysis
    • BUAD 836 – Problem Structuring and Analysis for Decision Making
    • GEOG 670 – Geographic Information Systems
    • GEOG 671 – Advanced Geographic Information Systems
    • GEOG 677 – Spatial Analysis
    • APEC 602 – Survey of Operations Research II
    • APEC 603 – Simulation Modeling and Analysis
    • STAT 601 – Probability Theory for Operations Research and Statistics
    • STAT 602 – Mathematical Statistics
    • STAT 608 – Statistical Research Methods
    • STAT 609 – Regression and Experimental Design
    • STAT 611 – Regression Analysis
    • UAPP 704 – Statistics for Policy Analysis
  • Social Science and Policy Analysis

Students without any computer programming or Computer Science background should take CISC 106CISC 181 or CISC 220. The College of Engineering also periodically offers courses in technical writing for graduate students. Students should strongly consider these courses when announcements are posted.

Faculty

Nii Attoh-Okine – computational intelligence and probabilistic reasoning in Civil Infrastructure Systems
Rachel Davidson – natural disaster risk analysis
Earl “Rusty” Lee – management and vulnerability of interdependent systems
Sue McNeil – asset management

Coastal Engineering

coastal engineering, wave mechanics, and environmental fluid mechanics

Overview

A broad engineering knowledge is required for the construction, protection, and maintenance of coastal communities and harbors, the development of offshore resources, and the preservation of estuarine and coastal areas. Generic engineering knowledge is crucial, despite the fact that construction of coastal and offshore facilities is highly dependent upon unique site-specific characteristics, such as local bathymetry, coastal topography and the offshore wave climate. Coastal engineers who work on the nearshore region face a wide variety of problems, including:

  • Prediction of long-term shoreline changes due to beach nourishment or presence of structures
  • Prediction of the forces a marine structure, including a levee, experiences over its lifetime
  • Prediction of wave-induced forces and currents on sediment redistribution and morphological change
  • Determination of the influence of sea level rise on coastal erosion and infrastructure
  • Determination of shallow water directional spectra and storm surge
  • Determination of correct breakwater design, including composition, shape, and orientation
  • Calculation of estuarine and harbor hydrodynamics and pollution transport
  • Wave breaking and air bubbles

Because of shoreline erosion from major storms and increasing sea level rise, pollution of estuaries, and the high cost of constructing and maintaining navigable channels and harbors, the demand for coastal research expertise is strong. The Center for Applied Coastal Research (www.coastal.udel.edu) is responding to this demand through the development of science and engineering methodologies to support design strategies for the coastal and offshore industry.

MCE/MAS Course Requirements

See the Master’s Degree Requirements in Civil Engineering for the general academic requirements. In addition, the Master’s degree in Civil Engineering or Applied Science in the field of Coastal Engineering requires three core courses and five electives taken from a variety of fields. Students electing to receive the non-thesis degree must take a total of 30 credits of course work, which typically translates to seven electives beyond the three core courses. Electives should be selected based on approval from your advisor.

PhD Requirements

PhD degrees are also offered in the Coastal Engineering field. The courses listed above serve as a foundation for the PhD degree. PhD students work with their advisor to develop a program of study that provides appropriate breadth and depth. See the PhD in Civil Engineering for the general academic requirements.

Courses

Core Courses:

  • CIEG 639 – Ocean Fluid Dynamics OR MAST691 – Fluid Dynamics in Marine Systems
  • CIEG 672 – Water Wave Mechanics
  • MEEG 690 – Intermediate Engineering Mathematics

Suggested electives include:

  • CIEG 670 – Physics of Cohesive Sediment
  • CIEG 675 – Matlab for Engineering Analysis
  • CIEG 678 – Transport and Mixing Processes
  • CIEG 679 – Sediment Transport Mechanics
  • CIEG 680 – Coastal Processes
  • CIEG 681 – Water Wave Spectra
  • CIEG 682 – Nearshore Hydrodynamics
  • CIEG 684 – Numerical Methods for Coastal Modeling
  • CIEG 870 – Offshore Design
  • CIEG 871 – Coastal Structures
  • CIEG 872 – Advanced Water Wave Mechanics
  • MAST 655 – Geophysical Fluid Dynamics
  • MAST 681 – Remote Sensing of Environment
  • MAST 693 – Waves in Marine Environment
  • MAST 808 – Coastal/Estuarine Physical Dynamics
  • GEOG 670 – Geographic Information Systems and Science
Faculty

Tian-Jian (Tom) Hsu – Fluid dynamics, sediment transport
James T. Kirby – Wave modeling, hydrodynamics
Nobuhisa Kobayashi – Sediment dynamics, coastal structures
Jack A. Puleo – Swash dynamics, field monitoring
Dr. Fengyan Shi – Numerical modeling of ocean waves, currents, and sediment transport

Environmental Engineering

water and wastewater treatment, environmental chemistry and remediation, and solid and hazardous waste management

Overview

The field of environmental engineering deals with environmental issues from the nanoscale to the global scale. Contamination caused by the activities and waste products of our modern society affect the water, air, soil, and ecosystems around us in complex ways that must be clearly understood if we are to successfully address these problems. In recognition of the interdisciplinary nature of these issues, our program provides students with a broad foundation in the fundamentals of physical, chemical, and biological processes. Advanced coursework and research in our graduate program is focused on the following areas:

  • Contaminant Movement and Treatment in Soil and Groundwater
  • Environmental Biotechnology
  • Environmental Chemistry and Nanotechnology
  • Green, Sustainable, and Global Environmental Technologies
  • Solid Waste and Hazardous Waste Management
  • Water Quality and Wastewater Engineering

The environmental engineering program is designed not only for those with undergraduate degrees in Civil and Environmental Engineering, and other engineering disciplines, but also related non-engineering fields such as Chemistry, Environmental Science, Geology, and many others.

MCE/MAS Course Requirements

See the Master’s Degree Requirements in Civil Engineering for the general academic requirements. In addition, the Master’s degree in Civil Engineering or Applied Science in the field of Environmental Engineering requires three core courses and five electives taken from a variety of fields. Students electing to receive the non-thesis degree must take a total of 30 credits of course work, which typically translates to seven electives beyond the three core courses. Electives should be selected based on approval from your advisor.

PhD Requirements

PhD degrees are also offered in the Environmental Engineering field. The courses listed above serve as a foundation for the PhD degree. PhD students work with their advisor to develop a program of study that provides appropriate breadth and depth. See the PhD in Civil Engineering for the general academic requirements.

Courses

Core Courses: (9 credits from the following core courses)

Suggested electives include:

In addition, classes from other departments can be selected in consultation with the advisor. These include graduate-level courses offered by Mathematics, Mechanical Engineering, Marine Studies, Geography, Urban Affairs and Public Policy, or Plant and Soil Sciences. Each semester students are also expected to register for CIEG865 – Environmental Engineering Seminar.

Faculty

Herbert E. Allen (Prof. Emeritus) – Environmental chemistry; fate and effects of pollutants in water, sediment, and soil; bioavailability of trace metals; development of environmental standards; ecological risk assessment; analytical chemistry

Daniel K. Cha – Biotransformation of environmental contaminants in natural and engineered systems; design and operation of wastewater treatment facilities; population dynamics of biological wastewater treatment processes

Pei C. Chiu – Kinetics and mechanisms of pollutant degradation; chemical and microbial reduction of organic compounds; elemental iron technologies for groundwater remediation and water and wastewater treatment

Dominic M. Di Toro – Water quality modeling, eutrophication and sediment flux models; water quality and sediment quality criteria models for organic chemicals, metals, mixtures; organic chemical and metal sorption models; statistical models

Chin-Pao Huang – Hazardous wastewater management; aquatic chemistry; soil and groundwater remediation; sustainable engineering; environmental applications and implications of nanotechnoloy

Paul T. Imhoff – Transport of fluids and contaminants in multiphase systems; mass transfer processes in soil and groundwater; sustainable landfilling; minimizing greenhouse gas emissions from engineered facilities; mathematical modeling

Julia Anne Maresca – Microbial contributions to greenhouse gas emissions; microbial secondary metabolites in mixed populations; microbial populations in contaminated environments

Geotechnical Engineering

computational geomechanics, soil mechanics, foundation engineering, earth structures engineering, and ground improvement

Overview

Civil engineering is the professional engineering discipline that deals with the design, construction, and maintenance of public and private infrastructure within the natural environment. Geotechnical engineering is a discipline within Civil Engineering that focuses on the behavior of natural geological materials in engineered systems. Geotechnical engineers recognize that soil and rock are the cheapest and most abundant building materials on earth, and consequently play a major role in the construction and performance of every type of civil engineering structure.

To be successful in the field of geotechnical engineering, students should have a broad exposure to Civil Engineering, with advanced knowledge and coursework in geology, soil and rock mechanics, slope stability, foundation engineering, and computational mechanics.

The Geotechnical Engineering program at the University of Delaware offers opportunities for advanced study and research in:

  • Soil and rock mechanics
  • Soil-structure interaction
  • Constitutive modeling
  • Computational geomechanics
  • Foundation and earth structures engineering
  • Ground improvement
  • Slope stability and landslide stabilization
  • Liquefaction of soils and earthquake engineering
  • Laboratory characterization of geomaterials and soil reinforcement
  • Environmental geotechnics

Given the strong need for improvement to our nation’s infrastructure, there is currently a high demand for geotechnical engineers within the civil engineering profession. Sustainable stewardship of our built environment is dependent on successful training of the future generation of civil engineers, both as researchers that are capable of advancing the state of the art, and as practitioners that have the ability to implement effective design solutions to real-world problems. A graduate degree in geotechnical engineering will give you the skills you need to succeed in both of these highly challenging environments.

MCE/MAS Course Requirements

See the Master’s Degree Requirements in Civil Engineering for the general academic requirements. In addition, the Master’s degree in Civil Engineering or Applied Science in the field of Geotechnical Engineering requires a total of three core course and five electives taken from a variety of fields. Students electing to receive the non-thesis degree must take a total of 30 credits of course work, which typically translates to seven electives beyond the three core courses. Electives should be selected based on approval from your advisor.

PhD Requirements

PhD degrees are also offered in the Geotechnical Engineering field. The courses listed above serve as a foundation for the PhD degree. PhD students work with their advisor to develop a program of study that provides appropriate breadth and depth. See the PhD in Civil Engineering for the general academic requirements.

Courses

Core Courses:

  • CIEG 601 – Introduction to the Finite Element Method
  • CIEG 622 – Earth Structures Engineering
  • CIEG 626 – Soil Behavior

Suggested CIEG Electives:

  • CIEG 605 – Intermediate Topics in Finite Element Analysis
  • CIEG 620 – Soil Mechanics II
  • CIEG 621 – Foundation Engineering
  • CIEG 623 – Soil Mechanics Lab
  • CIEG 625 – Geo-Environmental Engineering
  • CIEG 627 – Deep Foundations
  • CIEG 628 – Ground Improvement Methods
  • CIEG 658 – Pavement Analysis and Design
  • CIEG 675 – MATLAB for Engineering Analysis
  • CIEG 698 – Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport
  • CIEG 801 – Advanced Topics in Finite Element Analysis
  • CIEG 820 – Inelastic Behavior of Geomaterials
  • CIEG 867 – Computational Geomechanics

Other Suggested Courses:

  • CIEG 606 – Ocean and Atmosphere Remote Sensing (MAST 606)
  • GEOG 670 – Geographic Information Systems
  • GEOG 671 – Advanced Geographic Information Systems
  • GEOG 677 – Spatial Data Analysis
  • MAST 681 – Remote Sensing of Environment
  • MEEG 690 – Intermediate Engineering Mathematics
  • STAT 601 – Probability Theory for Operations Research and Statistics
  • STAT 602 – Mathematical Statistics
  • STAT 608 – Statistical Research Methods
  • STAT 609 – Regression and Experimental Design

In addition to the courses listed above, a variety of CIEG 667 Seminar courses are frequently offered by the professors in the geotechnical engineering group, and will be accepted for elective credit.

Faculty

Victor Kaliakin – Computational geomechanics and constitutive modeling of soils
Kalehiwot N. Manahiloh – Unsaturated Soil Mechanics, Microstructural analysis of granular geomaterials, Nondestructive testing (X-ray CT), Experimental, numerical, and computational geomechanics.
Christopher Meehan – Laboratory and in situ testing of soils, soil shear strength, slope stability, design of levees and embankment dams, and foundation engineering

Structural Engineering

structural mechanics, analysis, and design; bridge engineering; structural dynamics; computational mechanics; and structural engineering materials

Overview

The structural engineering program offers opportunities for graduate study and research in many subject areas related to the analysis and design of civil structures. Emphasis areas of the program include bridge engineering, building engineering, structural health monitoring, structural mechanics, structural dynamics, computational structural analysis and structural engineering materials.

MCE/MAS Course Requirements

See the Master’s Degree Requirements in Civil Engineering for the general academic requirements. In addition, the Master’s degree in Civil Engineering or Applied Science in the field of Structural Engineering requires three core courses in two different topic areas (as detailed below) and a minimum of five electives taken from a variety of fields for the thesis option. Students electing to receive the non-thesis degree must take a total of 30 credits of course work, which typically translates to seven electives beyond the three core courses. Electives should be selected based on approval from your advisor.

PhD Requirements

PhD degrees are also offered in the Structural Engineering field. The courses listed above serve as a foundation for the PhD degree. PhD students work with their advisor to develop a program of study that provides appropriate breadth and depth. See the PhD in Civil Engineering for the general academic requirements.

Courses

Core Courses:

Group 1 (6 credits required, 2 courses from the following list)

  • CIEG 601 – Introduction to the Finite Element Method
  • CIEG 611 – Structural Dynamics Design
  • CIEG 612 – Advanced Mechanics of Materials
  • CIEG 817 – Stability of Structures

Group 2 (3 credits required, 1 course from the following list)

Suggested Electives:

Additional courses in Groups 1 and 2 above

  • CIEG 605 – Intermediate Topics in Finite Element Analysis
  • CIEG 608 – Introduction to Bridge Design
  • CIEG 610 – Experimental Mechanics of Composite Materials
  • CIEG 619 – Mechanical Behavior of Materials and Structures
  • CIEG 621 – Foundation Engineering
  • CIEG 667 – Non-Destructive Testing for Civil Engineers
  • CIEG 667 – Structural Design for Extreme Events
  • CIEG 675 – MATLAB for Engineering Analysis
  • CIEG 801 – Advanced Topics in Finite Element Analysis
  • CIEG 811 – Advanced Structural Dynamics Design
  • CIEG 817 – Stability of Structures
  • MEEG 618 – Fracture of Solids
  • MEEG 690 – Intermediate Engineering Math
  • MEEG 813 – Theory of Elasticity
  • MEEG 814 – Theory of Plasticity
  • MEEG 816 – Advanced Continuum Mechanics
  • MEEG 817 – Composite Materials
Faculty
Michael Chajes – Bridge testing, evaluation, and rehabilitation; applications of advanced composite materials; structural analysis and design

Rachel Davidson – natural disaster risk analysis; civil infrastructure systems; engineers for a sustainable world

Jack Gillespie – Composite materials, mechanics and design, experimental mechanics, fracture mechanics, fabrication, infrastructure applications of composites

Jennifer McConnell – plasticity and stability of steel structures; design for extreme events; bridge engineering

Jovan Tatar – civil infrastructure systems, structural, sustainable transportation & infrastructure systems

Transportation Engineering

urban transportation, traffic engineering, systems engineering, logistics engineering, railroad engineering, and engineering management

Overview

The transportation engineering program offers opportunities for study and research in the planning, design, construction, operation, and management of transportation facilities and services. We emphasize systems approach to understand the interactions among transportation services, demand, mobility, socio-economic activities, environment, energy, and the quality of life in the region. We use a variety of techniques, from global positioning and geographic information systems to artificial intelligence, to solve problems in:

  • Transportation demand forecasting
  • Traffic engineering and controls
  • Construction methods and management
  • Logistics and freight transportation
  • Pavement design and performance
  • Intermodal urban transportation systems
  • Asset management

The education program maintains close links with the Delaware Center for Transportation and the University Transportation Center.

MCE/MAS Course Requirements

See the Master’s Degree Requirements in Civil Engineering for the general academic requirements. In addition, the Master’s degree in Civil Engineering or Applied Science in the field of Transportation with thesis requires four core courses and four electives taken from a variety of fields. For the non-thesis option, the four core courses should be supplemented with six electives. Electives should be selected based on approval from your advisor.

PhD Requirements

PhD degrees are also offered in the Transportation field. The courses listed above serve as a foundation for the PhD degree. PhD students work with their advisor to develop a program of study that provides appropriate breadth and depth. See the PhD in Civil Engineering for the general academic requirements.

Courses

Core Courses:

  • CIEG 652 – Transportation Facilities Planning & Design
  • CIEG 653 – Roadway Geometric Design
  • CIEG 654 – Transportation Planning
  • CIEG 663 – Traffic Engineering & Modeling

Suggested Electives:

  • APEC 601/APEC 602 – Survey of Operations Research
  • APEC 603 – Simulation Modeling & Analysis
  • BUAD 836 – Problem Structuring and Analysis for Decision Making
  • CIEG 614 – Railroad Geotechnical Engineering
  • CIEG 617 – Introduction to Railroad Safety and Derailment Engineering
  • CIEG 618 – Introduction to Railroad Engineering
  • CIEG 621 – Soil Mechanics
  • CIEG 641 – Risk Analysis
  • CIEG 650 – Urban Transportation Systems
  • CIEG 655 – Civil Infrastructure Systems
  • CIEG 658 – Pavement Analysis & Design
  • CIEG 686 – Engineering Project Management
  • ECON 801 – Microeconomics
  • ECON 802 – Macroeconomics
  • GEOG 670 – Geographic Information Systems
  • GEOG 671 – Advanced Geographic Information Systems
  • GEOG 677 – Spatial Data Analysis
  • MAST 663 – Decision Tools for Policy Analysis
  • MAST 672 – Applied Policy Analysis
  • STAT 601 – Probability Theory for Operations Research and Statistics
  • STAT 602 – Mathematical Statistics
  • STAT 608 – Statistical Research Methods
  • STAT 609 – Regression and Experimental Design
  • UAPP 601 – Measure and Define Planning Problems (1 credit)
  • UAPP 602 – Introduction to Comprehensive Planning (1 credit)
  • UAPP 603 – Introduction to Zoning and Land Use Controls (1 credit)

In addition other CIEG 667 Seminar courses are frequently offered covering contemporary topics in Transportation. Each semester students are also expected to register for CIEG865 – Civil Engineering Seminar.

Faculty
Nii Attoh-Okine – Pavement design and analysis; data science; civil infrastructure systems; probability graphical models in pavement engineering; MEMS applications in civil infrastructure systems; application of the Hilbert-Huang Transform; Big Data

Ardeshir Faghri – Transportation systems engineering; computer methods in transportation and traffic engineering; intelligent transportation systems; transportation in developing countries

Earl “Rusty” Lee – Modeling interdependent infrastructure systems with emphasis on system design, vulnerability and resilience; Uses of travel demand models to support planning and operations; models for demand response signal corridors; impacts of major events on transportation systems; safety data visualization.

Sue McNeil – Transportation asset management, life-cycle costing, application of advanced technologies, economic analysis, condition assessment and deterioration modeling, decision support

Mark M. Nejad – Autonomous and connected vehicles, electric vehicles, sustainable transportation, interdependent infrastructure systems, operations research, network optimization, cloud computing, game theory

Allan Zarembski – Railroad engineering, Railroad safety, Railroad track mechanics, Derailment Engineering, Railroad maintenance and planning

Water Resources Engineering

groundwater hydraulics, groundwater contamination, watershed management, hydrology, and water quality control

Overview

Water resources engineering involves the control of supply of surface and subsurface water to the public; control hazards associated with water, e.g., flooding; and maintain the health of ecological systems. Because water pollution is often the primary driving force for the engineered control of water resources, graduate students typically take courses and conduct research within groups that also include environmental engineering students. Graduate course work and research in the water resources engineering program is focused on the following areas:

  • Hydrology of Landfills
  • Watershed Hydrochemistry
  • Water Quality Modeling
  • Groundwater Hydrology
  • Contaminant Movement in Soil and Groundwater

The water resources engineering program is designed not only for those with undergraduate degrees in Bioresources, Civil, Environmental, or Chemical Engineering, but also related non-engineering fields such as Geology, Environmental Science and Soil Sciences.

MCE/MAS Course Requirements

See the Master’s Degree Requirements in Civil Engineering for the general academic requirements. The Master’s degree in Civil Engineering or Applied Science in the field of Water Resources Engineering requires four core courses and four electives taken from a variety of fields for the thesis option. Students electing to receive the non-thesis degree must take a total of 30-credits of course work, which typically translates to six electives beyond the four core courses. Electives should be selected based on approval from your advisor.

PhD Requirements

PhD degrees are also offered in the Water Resources Engineering field. The courses listed above serve as a foundation for the PhD degree. PhD students work with their advisor to develop a program of study that provides appropriate breadth and depth. See the PhD in Civil Engineering for the general academic requirements.

Courses

Core Courses:

  • CIEG 630 – Water Quality Modeling
  • CIEG 698 – Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport OR GEOL 628 – Hydrogeology
  • GEOG 632 – Environmental Hydrology
  • MATH/STAT – An approved 600-level course in Mathematics or Statistics

Suggested Electives:

  • CIEG 645 – Industrial Ecology : The Science of Environmental Sustainability
  • CIEG 667 – Research Methods and Topics in Soil/Water Systems: Science and Policy
  • CIEG 668 – Principles of Water Quality Criteria
  • CIEG 678 – Transport and Mixing Processes
  • CIEG 679 – Sediment Transport Mechanics
  • CIEG 833 – Fate of Organic Pollutants in the Environment
  • APEC 682 – Spatial Analysis of Natural Resources
  • GEOG 656 – Hydroclimatology
  • GEOG 657 – Climate Dynamics
  • GEOG 631– Watershed Hydro-Ecology
  • PLSC 603/BREG603– Soil Physics
  • PLSC 621 – Nonpoint Source Pollution
  • PLSC 643 – Watershed Hydrochemistry
  • UAPP 611/APEC611 – Regional Watershed Management
  • UAPP 628 – Issues in Land Use & Environmental Planning

In addition, classes from other departments can be selected in consultation with your advisor. These include graduate-level courses offered by Geography, Geology, Mathematics, Mechanical Engineering, Marine Studies, Plant and Soil Sciences, or Urban Affairs and Public Policy. Each semester students are also expected to register for CIEG865 – Civil Engineering Seminar.

Faculty

Dominic M. Di Toro – Water quality modeling; water quality and sediment quality criteria models for organic chemicals, metals, mixtures; organic chemical and metal sorption models; statistical models
Paul T. Imhoff – Transport of fluids and contaminants in multiphase systems; mass transfer processes in soil and groundwater; sustainable landfilling; minimizing greenhouse gas emissions from engineered facilities; mathematical modeling
Shreeram Inamdar (adjunct, Dept. of Bioresourses Engineering) – Controls of hydrologic flow paths on the exports of solutes and contaminants from watersheds; influence of wetlands and riparian ecosystems on water quality; watershed responses across spatial and temporal scales
Yan Jin (adjunct, Dept. of Plant and Soil Sciences) – Measurement and modeling of contaminant fate and transport in soil and groundwater; colloid retention mechanisms in saturated and unsaturated porous media
William F. Ritter (adjunct, Dept. of Bioresources Engineering) – Groundwater pollution; waste management; water quality modeling; surface water contamination; irrigation management

Academics Graduate Programs Graduate Concentrations